41FSWAC1JZL._SY411_BO1,204,203,200_
AT A GLANCE
Age
0-12 months, 1-2 yrs.
Touch/Feel/Manipulate?
Yes
Lift-the-flap?
No
Pop-up?
No
Sound?
No
Available in Spanish?
No

Little Mouse and Mommy

By Noelle & David Carter
Piggy Toes Press

 

This is a wonderful little book for infants and young toddlers. Following the same plot of the popular book, Is Your Mama a Llama by Deborah Guarino, a little mouse encounters different animals and asks each of them, “I am a little mouse. I’m looking for my mommy. Are you my mommy?”  Each animal responds by describing himself, and then declares, “I’m not a mouse.  I’m a ______!”  The question and answer repetition is wonderful for reinforcing language, and the short and simple animal descriptions are a good way to elicit conversation with your little one.  Younger babies can learn to identify animals and perhaps begin to pronounce some words for animals.

The illustrations in this book are very simple, but I sometimes think that more basic pictures are best for infants.  Sometimes too much going on can be overwhelming, so when a page features just one or two subjects, it can help infants focus and learn basic vocabulary.  In this book, the touch and feel textures more than make up for what the pictures lack.  The textures are varied:  dense fur, smooth and shiny iridescent paper, leather, a bumpy plastic material, and fuzzy cloth.  My infant son especially loves to pull the bear’s shaggy brown fur and scratch the leathery skin of the snake.

I should mention that besides the interesting textures, I think my son particularly loves this book because of the way I read it (which makes reading it a more fun experience for me as well!). I do a high, squeaky voice for the little mouse, and different voices for each of the other animals.  For example, I do a low, growly voice for the bear and I take advantage of the alliteration on the snake’s page by dragging out the “s” sound so that the snake sounds like he’s hissing.  I talk extra slowly when we get to the turtle’s page.  Reading in such a way really makes a story come alive, heightens children’s awareness of voice and tone, and can add meaning to the text.  This is a perfect story for playing with voices because it adds dimension, character, and meaning to each animal.

Overall, this is a sweet little story for your little sweet pea.  What baby wouldn’t love a story of a baby animal and his mommy, especially one that ends with the words, “I love you!”?

Extension Activity

Of course the highlight of this book is touching and feeling the different textures of the animals, so why not go beyond the pages and explore other textures with your little one? Find objects around the house that have similar textures as the ones featured in the book, as well as ones that are completely different.  Don’t limit the objects to your baby’s hands; run the object over his body- on his back, legs, toes, etc. Make sure you talk about the different textures by using adjectives such as “shaggy,” “soft,” “rough,” “furry,” etc.  Some suggestions for objects that have interesting textures are feathers, wrapping paper, tissue paper (so fun to crinkle!), and fur. The possibilities are really endless (so long as the object is baby safe of course!).

 

Reviewed by Daniela

Book image via amazon.com

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